escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep escort gaziantep

GARDENING THE PLANET

For humans, the world has always been a terrifying place so enclosing part of it, kicking out or killing everything threatening and cultivating only that perceived to be controllable and useful enjoys a long tradition. In a pre-industrial world, it could be argued that this made sense. Now the roles are reversed and to preserve that which used to threaten us we must establish “wilderness areas” or “nature preserves”.

Photographers share a subtractive process of art-making with sculptors and gardeners and as tourists know, the viewfinder provides much the same sense of security as sitting in a back yard. It’s also easier making nice pictures in a garden than in a forest, somebody else having already brought together, ordered and framed the best bits. Predecessors in this tradition include Eugène Atget and more recently, Scott McFarland, Geoffrey James and in their own way, Richard Misrach and Edward Burtynsky.

While acknowledging the tradition, my work departs from the established model in crucial ways. The “gardens” I photograph – primarily urban landscapes – are unacknowledged as such and ungoverned by any obvious, all-encompassing plan. My choice of technique – long, narrow, composite images that take in the full periphery of the horizon – effectively subverts traditional notions of pictorial order. This is further emphasized by the capacity of the four, individual elements that comprise each image to be re-ordered in a number of equally legitimate, configurations. This “re-framing” both re-directs the viewer’s attention toward a greater consideration of the contained than the form of containment and simultaneously serves as a metaphor for the power of humans to modify the environment contained.

Images in this series range between 30.5 cm. x 366 cm. and 61 cm x 732 cm.

 

 

Wildwood Community Club

Winnipeg, Manitoba.

49° 50’ 56.86” N  97° 07’ 40.91” W

October 03, 2003.  9:50 – 9:55 am.

(Full Size Image)

 

Off McGillivray Blvd.

Winnipeg, Manitoba.

49° 49’ 26.82” N  97° 11’ 21.48” W

August 30, 2004.  2:05 – 2:10 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

Market Square,

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 53’ 53.39” N  97° 08’ 26.02” W

September 11, 2004.  2:47 – 2:52 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

King Street & William Avenue,

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 53’ 56.74” N  97° 08’ 24.77” W

September 11, 2004.  3:08 – 3:11 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

 

Westview Park,

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 54’ 09.80” N  97° 11’ 37.46” W

September 27, 2004.  12:27 – 12:32 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

Beside North Drive,

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 50’ 46.48” N  97° 07’ 24.21” W

April 19, 2006.  9:07 – 9:14 am.

(Full Size Image)

 

North Drive and Oakenwald Avenue,

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 51’ 00.48” N  97° 07’ 44.40” W

May 27, 2006.  9:32 – 935 am.

(Full Size Image)

 

Between St. James and Empress Streets

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 54’ 08.73” N  97° 11’ 50.83” W

June 27, 2006.  2:37 – 2:39 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

Millennium Gardens,

Winnipeg, Manitoba

49° 56’ 52.35” N  97° 04’ 57.62” W

July, 11, 2006  12:20 – 12:26 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

Cranberry Flats Conservation Area

Near Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

52° 01’ 44.10” N  106° 42’ 18.25” W

October 13, 2004.  11:53 – 11:59 am.

(Full Size Image)

 

Behind 2301, Adelaide St. East

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

52° 06’ 12.84” N  106° 37’ 09.11” W

October 13, 2004.  2:20 – 2:24 pm.

(Full Size Image)

 

East St. Paul, Manitoba

Unrecorded Coordinates

July 11, 2006.  3:32 – 3:36 pm.

(Full Size Image)